Archive for the ‘Cardio & Blood-Сholesterol’ Category

REDUCING YOUR RISK OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE: EATING FOR BETTER HEALTH – BASIC EATING GUIDELINES – HOW TO DECREASE YOUR SUGAR INTAKE & FATS

Wednesday, July 6th, 2011
How to decrease your sugar intake
Best Choices
Fruit juices (unsweetened and in reasonable amounts), sugar-free carbonated beverages, sparkling water, fresh or unsweetened fruit (reasonable amounts), sugar-free hot chocolate, sugar-free gelatin or pudding, bread sticks, popcorn, or pretzels
Go Easy On
Plain donuts, plain cookies (such as vanilla wafers), plain cakes (such as angel food cake)
Limit or Avoid
Regular sweetened soft drinks, lemonade, and fruit drinks, cake, pie, donuts, pastries, ice cream, ice milk, sherbet, sorbet, sugar-sweetened gelatin, cereals with more than 5 grams of sucrose and other sugars per ounce, candy, chocolate, sugar, honey, jam, or jelly
Fats
Best Choices (in small amounts)
Polyunsaturated oils (safflower, corn, sunflower, soybean, sesame, or cottonseed) and monounsaturated oils (olive, canola, or peanut). Salad dressings made with unsaturated oils, margarine made from polyunsaturated oil, or margarine whose main ingredient is “liquid” oil (listed first on the label)
Go Easy On
Mayonnaise, creamy salad dressings, reduced-fat sour cream or cream cheese
Limit or Avoid
Saturated fats, including butter, lard, and bacon. Gravy and cream sauces, cream, half-and-half, sour cream, cream cheese, hydrogenated margarine and shortening, cocoa butter (found in chocolate), coconut oil, palm oil, palm-kernel oil, most nondairy creamers, and nondairy whipped toppings
*301\252\8*
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HYPERTENSION AND COENZYME Q10

Tuesday, February 1st, 2011
Every cell in your body contains coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), also known as ubiquinone. It is involved in the manufacture of energy in the mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cells. Since your heart is your most metabolically active organ, CoQ10 is naturally more concentrated in this organ. Your body produces its own CoQ10, yet deficiencies are common, especially in patients with hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. Low levels have been noted in 39 percent of patients with high blood pressure, and heart biopsies of cardiac patients show deficiencies of up to 75 percent when compared with CoQ10 levels in normal heart tissue. Not surprisingly, supplemental coenzyme Q10 has astounding effects on the heart.
One of my patients, 24-year-old Bill, was admitted to the hospital with severe cardiomyopathy, or degeneration of the heart muscle. His lungs were filled with fluid and his heart rhythm was completely erratic. His ejection fraction (an indication of the heart’s pumping capacity) was only 17 percent (normal is above 50 percent). Bill’s prognosis was dismal – only half of the patients in his condition survive one year. On my recommendation (not that of his cardiologist, who wasn’t even familiar with this nondrug therapy), Bill started taking large amounts of CoQ10, as well as other nutritional supplements. Much to his doctor’s surprise, he fully recovered. He was able to finish college and is now leading a normal, productive life. He has no activity restrictions, nor is he taking any medications.
The medical literature is full of studies documenting similar “miraculous” recoveries in patients with cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure after taking CoQ10. A number of important studies confirm the value of CoQ10 in controlling hypertension as well. In a 1994 study conducted at the University of Texas, Dr. Peter Langsjoen and colleagues treated 109 hypertensive patients with an average dose of 225 milligrams of CoQ10 daily, in addition to their prescribed drug regimen. Within five months, a remarkable 51 percent of the patients were able to come off from one to three antihypertensive drugs. In addition, 9.4 percent of the patients were found to have “highly significant” improvements in their diastolic function and the integrity of the left ventricular wall of the heart, the area most affected by hypertension.
Most physicians are still in the dark about CoQ10, even with sufficient evidence showing that low tissue levels of this coenzyme are linked to cardiovascular disease. CoQ10 has tremendous clinical value in the treatment of hypertension, congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and mitral valve prolapse. There were excellent results with this supplement and absolutely require my hypertensive patients to take it, in a dose of 180 to 200 milligrams per day. CoQ10 must be taken with fat for proper absorption. Take it with a meal that contains a little healthy fat, or purchase oil-based CoQ10 gel-caps or chewable CoQ10 wafers that contain a small amount of fat. Be patient – it may take four to twelve weeks before the effects of CoQ10 are noticed.
*82/313/5*

HYPERTENSION AND COENZYME Q10Every cell in your body contains coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), also known as ubiquinone. It is involved in the manufacture of energy in the mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cells. Since your heart is your most metabolically active organ, CoQ10 is naturally more concentrated in this organ. Your body produces its own CoQ10, yet deficiencies are common, especially in patients with hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. Low levels have been noted in 39 percent of patients with high blood pressure, and heart biopsies of cardiac patients show deficiencies of up to 75 percent when compared with CoQ10 levels in normal heart tissue. Not surprisingly, supplemental coenzyme Q10 has astounding effects on the heart.One of my patients, 24-year-old Bill, was admitted to the hospital with severe cardiomyopathy, or degeneration of the heart muscle. His lungs were filled with fluid and his heart rhythm was completely erratic. His ejection fraction (an indication of the heart’s pumping capacity) was only 17 percent (normal is above 50 percent). Bill’s prognosis was dismal – only half of the patients in his condition survive one year. On my recommendation (not that of his cardiologist, who wasn’t even familiar with this nondrug therapy), Bill started taking large amounts of CoQ10, as well as other nutritional supplements. Much to his doctor’s surprise, he fully recovered. He was able to finish college and is now leading a normal, productive life. He has no activity restrictions, nor is he taking any medications.The medical literature is full of studies documenting similar “miraculous” recoveries in patients with cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure after taking CoQ10. A number of important studies confirm the value of CoQ10 in controlling hypertension as well. In a 1994 study conducted at the University of Texas, Dr. Peter Langsjoen and colleagues treated 109 hypertensive patients with an average dose of 225 milligrams of CoQ10 daily, in addition to their prescribed drug regimen. Within five months, a remarkable 51 percent of the patients were able to come off from one to three antihypertensive drugs. In addition, 9.4 percent of the patients were found to have “highly significant” improvements in their diastolic function and the integrity of the left ventricular wall of the heart, the area most affected by hypertension.Most physicians are still in the dark about CoQ10, even with sufficient evidence showing that low tissue levels of this coenzyme are linked to cardiovascular disease. CoQ10 has tremendous clinical value in the treatment of hypertension, congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and mitral valve prolapse. There were excellent results with this supplement and absolutely require my hypertensive patients to take it, in a dose of 180 to 200 milligrams per day. CoQ10 must be taken with fat for proper absorption. Take it with a meal that contains a little healthy fat, or purchase oil-based CoQ10 gel-caps or chewable CoQ10 wafers that contain a small amount of fat. Be patient – it may take four to twelve weeks before the effects of CoQ10 are noticed.*82/313/5*

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CARDIAC DRUGS: NITROGLYCERINE – AN EFFECTIVE WAY TO STOP THE PAIN

Thursday, January 20th, 2011
This is very effective in stopping the pain of angina pectoris. Some preparations of nitroglycerine are swallowed, but usually a small white pill is placed under the tongue and allowed to dissolve. If the pain is relieved and then recurs, a second or third nitroglycerine pill may be taken. If the pills are taken too close together, the blood pressure may fall and the person will feel faint. This can be remedied by lying down until the effect of the drug wears off.
When the typical chest pain of angina begins, a pill should be taken. There is no advantage in waiting one, two, or five minutes. Some patients hesitate to use nitroglycerine because they fear that they will become addicted to it or that it will lose its effectiveness. If the pill does lose its effectiveness, it is usually because the disease in the coronary arteries has progressed beyond the point at which this type of medicine will help. The patient has not developed a tolerance to the drug, and addiction to nitroglycerine does not occur.
Nitroglycerine tablets begin to deteriorate within six months after they are exposed to air. Some patients note that when they take a nitroglycerine tablet they feel a throbbing in the head. If this sensation does not occur several months later, it may be an indication that the drug has lost its effectiveness.
*33/309/5*

CARDIAC DRUGS: NITROGLYCERINE – AN EFFECTIVE WAY TO STOP THE PAIN This is very effective in stopping the pain of angina pectoris. Some preparations of nitroglycerine are swallowed, but usually a small white pill is placed under the tongue and allowed to dissolve. If the pain is relieved and then recurs, a second or third nitroglycerine pill may be taken. If the pills are taken too close together, the blood pressure may fall and the person will feel faint. This can be remedied by lying down until the effect of the drug wears off.When the typical chest pain of angina begins, a pill should be taken. There is no advantage in waiting one, two, or five minutes. Some patients hesitate to use nitroglycerine because they fear that they will become addicted to it or that it will lose its effectiveness. If the pill does lose its effectiveness, it is usually because the disease in the coronary arteries has progressed beyond the point at which this type of medicine will help. The patient has not developed a tolerance to the drug, and addiction to nitroglycerine does not occur.Nitroglycerine tablets begin to deteriorate within six months after they are exposed to air. Some patients note that when they take a nitroglycerine tablet they feel a throbbing in the head. If this sensation does not occur several months later, it may be an indication that the drug has lost its effectiveness.*33/309/5*

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